Med Mal and Procedural case

This is similar to the cases where a peer doctor fails to review sufficient documentation before arriving at an opinion.

“Lack of Foundation to form an expert opinion”

Luu v Paskowski
2008 NY Slip Op 10135 (2d Dept. 2008)

The pertinent portion of this case is as follows:

“[Plaintiff’s expert] Zola did not refer to any part of the hospital records, and did not state when the blood loss occurred or how it caused the small bowel obstruction and hematoma. Zola made no reference to any of the hospital records in his affidavit, and did not state that he had reviewed the pleadings and depositions. Zola’s affidavit was conclusory and lacked a foundation (see Thompson v Orner, 36 AD3d at 792; Furey v Kraft, 27 AD3d at 418).

Procedural – default viz a vi failure to obtain an adjournment on the record

Diamond v Diamante
2008 NY Slip Op 10117 (2d Dept. 2008)

“plaintiffs and their attorney, nonparty James D. Reddy, appeal from a judgmentwhich, inter alia, upon the denial of the plaintiffs’ application for an adjournment, is in favor of the defendants and against the plaintiff, dismissing the complaint, and against the nonparty James D. Reddy awarding costs and imposing sanctions.”

“Where, as here, the order appealed from was made upon the plaintiffs’ default, “review is limited to matters which were the subject of contest below” (Matter of Constance P. v Avraam G., 27 AD3d 754, 755 [internal quotations marks omitted]; see James v Powell, 19 NY2d 249, 256 n 3; Wexler v Wexler, 34 AD3d 458, 459; Brown v Data Communications, 236 AD2d 499). [*2]Accordingly, in this case, review is limited to the denial of the plaintiffs’ request for an adjournment, on the appeal by the plaintiffs, and the award of costs and imposition of sanctions against nonparty James D. Reddy, on the appeal by the nonparty (see Matter of Paulino v Camacho, 36 AD3d 821, 822; Tun v Aw, 10 AD3d 651, 652).

Turning to the merits, “[t]he granting of an adjournment for any purpose is a matter resting within the sound discretion of the trial court” (Matter of Anthony M., 63 NY2d 270, 283; see Matter of Steven B., 6 NY3d 888, 889; Matter of Sicurella v Embro, 31 AD3d 651, lv denied 7 NY3d 717), and its determination will not be disturbed absent an improvident exercise of that discretion (see Davidson v Davidson, 54 AD3d 988). “In making such a determination, the court must undertake a balanced consideration of all relevant factors” (Matter of Sicurella v Embro, 31 AD3d at 651), including “the merit or lack of merit of the action, extent of the delay,” the number of adjournments granted, the “lack of intent to deliberately default or abandon the action” and the length of the pendency of the proceeding (Belsky v Lowell, 117 AD2d 575, 576; see Matter of Claburn v Claburn, 128 AD2d 937, 938).”

The future is bright for medical necessity msj's

Again, this is not necessarily a pure no-fault post. However, this is a no-fault post by analogy. I came across a doosy of a decision and order from the Appellate Division, Second Department. It kind of cuts both ways on two different issues. Hopefully you will see where I am going with this, after you see the excepts I am publishing.

Geffner v North Shore Univ. Hosp.
2008 NY Slip Op 10124 (2d Dept. 2008)

To support her allegations [of medical malpractice and in opposition to Defendant’s motion for summary judgment], the plaintiff submitted the expert affidavit of Charles Phillips, a physician certified in emergency medicine. Dr. Phillips’ affidavit was of no probative value, however, as it contained opinions outside his area of expertise and did not establish a foundation for his opinions (see Glazer v Choong-Hee Lee, 51 AD3d 970; Mustello v Berg, 44 AD3d 1018, 1018-1019; Behar v Coren, 21 AD3d 1045, 1046-1047)….

“Finally, the plaintiff submitted the expert affirmations of Howard C. Adelman, a physician certified in clinical pathology and cytopathology, which alleged that the defendant doctors misdiagnosed the decedent as suffering from myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia, and adenocarcinoma. Dr. Adelman’s affirmations were insufficient to raise a triable issue of fact with respect to the alleged misdiagnoses since they failed to address the evidence relied upon by North Shore’s experts in rendering their opinions that the diagnoses were correct (see Germaine v Yu, 49 AD3d 685, 687; Fhima v Maimonides Med. Ctr., 269 AD2d 559, 560).

Issue #1: Doctors who give opinions outside their scope of expertise.

This is a problem, however, an accounting of their skills and expertise should get one of the trouble that was wrought in this cae

Issue #2: Failure to address movant’s proof.

Big problem in no-fault litigation.

Some newer cases

It has been a real quiet few months in our world of law. Nothing too substantial has come out recently. There have been some procedural cases, which have an effect on all areas of law. Here are some of the cases I have found which have interesting overtones to them:

Stipulation of discontinuance with prejudice = presumption of res judicata

Support Billing & Mgt. Co. v State Farm Mut. Ins. Co.
2008 NYSlipOp 52226(U)(App. Term 2d Dept. 2008)

“A stipulation of discontinuance which specifies that it is “with prejudice” raises a presumption that the stipulation is to be given res judicata effect in future litigation on the same cause of action”

Discovery on a precluded defense requires proof of a timely denial – timely denial means more than it being facially timely…

Corona Hgts. Med., P.C. v State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co.
2008 NYSlipOp 52185(U)(App. Term 2d Dept. 2008)

“Where a discovery demand concerns matters relating to a defense which a defendant is precluded from raising, it is palpably improper, notwithstanding the fact that the plaintiff did not specifically object thereto (see A.B. Med. Servs. PLLC, 11 Misc 3d 71). As defendant did not establish that it timely denied plaintiff’s claims, to the extent defendant seeks discovery in support of its defense of lack of medical necessity, discovery of such precluded matter is palpably improper”

Court sanctions more than one discovery device being demanded simulataneously

First Aid Occupational Therapy, PLLC v State Farm Mut. Auto. Ins. Co.

2008 NY Slip Op 51963(U)(App. Term 2d Dept, 2008).

In addition, defendant is entitled to conduct an EBT of plaintiff notwithstanding the fact that defendant also served a demand for discovery and inspection of documents (see Woods v Alexander, 267 AD2d 1060, 1061 [1999]; Iseman v Delmar Med.-Dental Bldg., 113 AD2d 276 [1985]; JMJ Contract Mgt. v Ingersoll-Rand Co., 100 AD2d 291, 293 [1984]).

CCA 1201 – give us a reason for allowing an extraterritorial subpoena

Bronxborough Med., P.C. v Travelers Ins. Co.
21 Misc.3d 21 (App. Term 2d Dept. 2008)

Inasmuch as plaintiff’s moving papers failed to establish that the interests of justice would be served by permitting plaintiff to serve, outside the City of New York and the adjoining counties, a subpoena which would require defendant’s employee to appear at trial, and, in addition, did not set forth the location at which plaintiff sought to serve the subpoena, plaintiff’s motion was properly denied.

Don’t send the peer or IME upon demand – the courts will forgive you, but the DOI probably will not.

Careplus Med. Supply, Inc. v New York Cent. Mut. Fire Ins. Co.

21 Misc.3d 18 (App. Term 2d Dept. 2008)

In response to a provider seeking to preclude an insurance carrier from raising a defense of lack of medical necessity based upon the pre-suit failure to turn over the peer or IME report in accordance with the regulations, the Appellate Term said no so fast…

“The Insurance Department Regulations provide no sanction for an insurer’s failure to provide a peer review report upon the written{**21 Misc 3d at 20}{**21 Misc 3d at 20} request for one by a provider (see e.g. A.B. Med. Servs. PLLC v Clarendon Natl. Ins. Co., 12 Misc 3d 143[A], 2006 NY Slip Op 51415[U] [App Term, 2d & 11th Jud Dists 2006]). While plaintiff urges the court to impose the sanction of preclusion here, we decline to do so because “[h]ad it been the intent of the Department of Insurance” to impose such a sanction, “it would have so provided”

Do not file a notice of trial without obtaining a final order of preclusion or dismissal, etc.

Iscowitz v. County of Suffolk
54 A.D.3d 725 (2d Dept. 2008)

“The plaintiffs waived any objection to the adequacy and timeliness of the disclosure by filing a note of issue and certificate of readiness prior to moving pursuant to CPLR 3126 for the imposition of a discovery sanction

Preclusion – The Appellate Division spells out why we should not sign preclusion stipulations.

Allen v Calleja
2008 NY Slip Op 08685 (2d Dept. 2008)

To warrant preclusion, “the Supreme Court must determine that the offending party’s lack of cooperation with disclosure was willful, deliberate, and contumacious” (Assael v Metropolitan Tr. Auth., 4 AD3d 443, 443; see CPLR 3126[2]; Moog v City of New York, 30 AD3d 490). Such conduct may be found where, for example, a party repeatedly fails to comply with court orders directing it to produce certain discovery without adequate excuses therefor

And when it comes to the inability to invoke “preclusion” based upon a single failure to comply with a conditional order of preclusion (when this was the first discovery order in the case), the Appellate Term, First Department said the following:

Pelham Parkway Neuro & Diagnostic, P.C. v. Liberty Mut. Ins. Co.

16 Misc.3d 130(A)(App. Term 1st Dept. 2007)

In this action to recover assigned first party no-fault benefits, the drastic sanction of precluding defendant from asserting its defense of exhaustion of policy limits was unwarranted in the absence of a showing that defendant’s single failure to comply with the parties’ discovery stipulation was willful and contumacious

Prima facie: schizophrenia from the Appellate Term

Mary Immaculate Hosp. v New York Cent. Mut. Fire Ins. Co.
2008 NY SlipOp 52046(U)(App. Term 2d Dept. 9th and 10th Jud. Dis. 2008)

I have been waiting for the day when a Henig Hospital case with the famous Hospital Receivable’s third-party billing affidavit (which we all know is insufficient to lay a proper foundation for entry into evidence of the billing forms) to be evaluated by the Appellate Term, Second Department.

Let me explain. The famous Mary Immaculate Hosp. v Allstate Ins. Co., 5 AD3d 742 (2d Dept. 2004) case is a Appellate Division, Second Department case, which involved a Henig third-party biller affidavit. The Apppellate Division, as we all know, said that a prima facie case consists of submission of a claim form, and proof that the bill is overdue. Therefore, Mary Immaculate was granted summary judgment.

Here, the Appellate Term today ducked the prima facie issue. The Court said that the issue is not preserved since the issue was not raised in the initial answering papers of New York Central Mutual. Therefore, the issue was not before the Court.

However, the case which this case “cf” cited said that the issue of admissiblity of business records may be raised for the first time on appeal. See, Bath Med. Supply, Inc. v Deerbrook Ins. Co. , 14 Misc 3d 135(A)(App. Term 2d and 11th Jud. Dis. 2007). Yet, this case said that an appellate court may not do this. My suspicion is that the Appellate Term did not want to deal with the fact that these third-party affidavits are sufficient before the Appellate Division, yet are not acceptable before the Appellate Term.

I feel that at some point, we are going to have a prima facie showdown in the Second Department. I believe this will happen soon.