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April 2019 (add 18 months for no-fault): a new fee scheduleJanuary 15, 2019

The text of the amendments.

Some good things have come from the new Workers Compensation Fee Schedule Changes.

First, chiropractors cannot leave their fee schedule. Perhaps nothing was more cumbersome than seeing creative chiropractic billing.

Second, ROM/MTT/PFT are dead. I guess the computerized ROM was part of the initial comprehensive visit after all. Bad joke.

Third, Manipulation Under Anesthesia is gone. I wish this billing machine went away sooner and would be exempt from the 18 month regulator holiday.

Fourth, the pricing of EMG/NCVs are about 50% of what they are currently. More importantly, the surface EMGs and every type of name for them (CPT/neurometer/PFNCS) are gone. Good to see these billing magnets de-polarized.

Fifth, various physical medicine modality providers are getting pay raises. While this will adversely effect paid premium dollar, it makes sense if only because major medical compensates at or near $100 per diem for physical therapy. A good physical therapy facility is worth every dollar of this pay raise. What is problematic here is that no-fault does not contain any co-pays or “real” deductibles, which causes product over-utilization. This in turn causes the proliferation of “heat and stim” clinics. The deletion of the 180-day/12 session rule from proposed Ground Rule 2 will only exacerbate the over utilization of resources that are endemic in the no-fault system.

Sixth, the 8 unit rule (and associated per diem unit rules) is distinct for each provider from what I read. Assuming each unit represents 15 minutes of care, I seriously challenge someone to tell me that an EIP really received 16 units of treatment per diem. The winners here will be the providers, the lawyers representing the providers, the defense counsel who will perform the time-based treatment EUO per patient, the IME doctors who will be needed to cut off treatment earlier and the RICO firms who will use mail fraud and health care fraud as the predicate acts in support of the substantive and inchoate racketeering allegations.

Seventh, I believe there are myriad other fee-coding changes, which I have not studied nor held side-by-side to the current fee schedule.

My biggest concern here is that allowing a pay raise without resource allotment (i.e treatment guidelines) will probably cause average claim pay outs to exceed $20k assuming current treatment trends continue. The comments from WCB place this potential inferno into DFS’ lap.

The 18 month holiday regulation: “any such increases shall not be effective for no-fault until eighteen months after the effective date of the increases established by the chair.” 11 NYCRR § 68.1

Please note that 68.1(b) expired, and DFS may be working on new implementing regulations. Sta tuned.

2 Responses

  1. Squid Pro Quo says:

    No question that the increased fees will not go into effect for an additional 18 months. However, reading new subsection 2, it does not say anything about delaying the application of new or amended ground rules. Read with the SuperIntEndent’s letter, one could argue that the 18 month delay is purely to protect carriers – who may be allowed to raise premiums – so the likiting ground rules could arguably be said to apply now regardless, whether fairly or not.