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Permanent consequential v. Significant limitaton – the value of early surgeryNovember 14, 2014

Sutliff v Qadar, 2014 NY Slip Op 07769 (1st Dept. 2014)

This case really discusses the danger on the personal injury side of the “significant limitation prong” of 5102(d).

Factually, there was an accident in December 2009.  The Claimant presumably had standard PT and other treatments.  He had positive clinical tests and other positive objective tests.  The Plaintiff underwent shoulder surgery February, 2010.

We learn that there was  minor limitation of the shoulder in June, 2010. Presumably. an IME in 2012 or 2013 found normal range of motion and attributed the injury to other forces.

On this record the following happened:

Permanent Consequential

(1) plaintiff failed to raise a triable issue of fact as to the existence of a “permanent consequential” limitation of use of the left shoulder.

(2) On the causation issue (and this is interesting): “To the extent plaintiff argues that the orthopedist found a causally related injury, the orthopedist opined that the causally related injury amounted to only a minor contusion and, based on his review of plaintiff’s medical records, attributed the more serious symptoms to the preexisting injury (see Bravo v Martinez, 105 AD3d 458, 458 [1st Dept 2013]).”

Significant Limitation

“The affirmed reports of plaintiff’s treating physician found substantial limitations and positive clinical tests results in January 2010, a month after the accident, and plaintiff underwent shoulder surgery in February 2010 (see Thomas v NYLL Mgt. Ltd., 110 AD3d 613, 614 [1st Dept 2013]; cf. Vasquez v Almanzar, 107 AD3d 538, 539-540 [1st Dept 2013]). The treating physician also noted that plaintiff’s prior shoulder injury improved with therapy, and opined that the subject accident caused significant injuries to the left shoulder. This evidence, as well as evidence that plaintiff returned to work full time over a year prior to the subject accident, raises a triable issue of fact as to whether this accident caused an aggravation or exacerbation of the prior injury (see Nelson v Tamara Taxi Inc., 112 AD3d 547, 548 [1st Dept 2013]). Further, plaintiff submitted an MRI report performed after the accident, and an operative report of his orthopedic surgeon, which provide objective proof of a preexisting partial tear that may have been aggravated by the subject accident, and of a new symptom following this accident ”

What do I take out of this?

Causation is varies on the prongs of the statute, which is strange.  But it tells us that a positive MRI, clinical results and early surgery will satisfy significant limitation.  Also, a Plaintiff who went back to work from a prior injury but then lost time from work will raise an issue of fact as to causation.

This one hurts the carriers, and I think increases the importance of early surgery in increasing the value of a PI case.  I cannot believe I am saying that exposing people to the risks normally attendant with surgery prematurely will many times shield the Plaintiff from being nonsuited on a significant linitation claim.

No Fault angle

No Fault covers any exacerbation.  We see (at least as to permanent consequential) that this not the case: “the orthopedist opined that the causally related injury amounted to only a minor contusion and, based on his review of plaintiff’s medical records, attributed the more serious symptoms to the preexisting injury”

In no-fault, any causal relationship would be payable by no-fault.  On the PI side, if you can disaggregate the symptoms, causation is not as clear cut and will go to the jury.  I have been looking for a case where the theory that the BI coverage on causation is less expansive as no-fault.

 

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