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Red MeatJuly 3, 2012

Matter of Matter of Golia v Velez, 2012 NY Slip Op 05337 (1st Dept. 2012)

Nothing like Supreme Court Justices from the Appellate Division having to judge the actions of a recently retired Supreme Court Justice.  The petitioner here was the only Justice at the Appellate Term who realized half way through his tenure (about 2006) that his legal rulings, in effect, encouraged a systematic fraud upon the courts in this State.

In any event, he should not have turned a garage into habitable space.  Not smart.

7 Responses

  1. Captain America says:

    After 2006 his legal rulings allowed insurance companies to deny payment of claims at will which, in effect, turned the Court into a fraud upon the citizens of the State of New York.

    As a Supreme Court Justice he threw a man out of his home after the man had been a victim of mortgage fraud. The criminals — all of them convicted — forged his signature to take out a mortgage. Despite the guilty pleas Golia backed the Mortgage Company against the poor home owner.

    One should go the bottom of the now defunct Zuppa’s Pit. All the way at the bottom. Zuppa gathered a series of stories on the defrauded homeless home owner’s relentless war with Golia.

    It ended tragically with the homeowner leaving behind a videotape warning of his imminent death and saying if it happened it was by the hand of Judge Golia.

    Months later the man was found dead with head trauma which may or may not have been caused by a blow to the head sayeth the police. That’s all the police will say resisting any FOIL Requests but refusing to investigate.

    The Captain does not believe the good justice capable of homicide and sees nothing wrong with turning one’s garage into habital space.

  2. Larry Rogak says:

    A man should be able to live in his own garage if he wants to. But then again he should be able to buy a 48 ounce soda if he wants to.

    • JT says:

      On Long Island, it seems more common that a garage is used for rental purposes than for storage purposes. Then again, with the average property tax bill hovering around $10,000 per year, on top of the mortgage on an underwater house, can you really blame the home owner? I cannot say the same thing about where the dwelling unit in this case was since I am not personally familiar with NYC property taxes.

  3. Sun Tzu says:

    “Nothing like Supreme Court Justices from the Appellate Division having to judge the actions of a recently retired Supreme Court Justice. The petitioner here was the only Justice at the Appellate Term who realized half way through his tenure (about 2006) that his legal rulings, in effect, encouraged a systematic fraud upon the courts in this State.”

    So your attempt to bolster him is an admission that he has been biased against providers since 2006, he thinks they are all frauds, and that this mindset has tainted his decisions.

    For someone who has read every App Term decision since around 2006, your explanation makes sense.

  4. Sun Tzu says:

    Oh, btw, I’m back.

    Who wants to learn how to sue MVAIC and make it stick through judgment?

  5. Larry Rogak says:

    I know this isn’t the place to argue national issues, but it strikes me as inconsistent and contradictory for a government to refuse to enforce its immigration laws and at the same time punish taxpaying homeowners for creating “illegal” apartments. These are not unrelated issues. Many of those illegal apartments are created for the purpose of renting out to illegal immigrants. Random and inconsistent enforcement of laws is an injustice.

  6. Captain America says:

    Justice = $$$$: Got it Lawrence Rogak.

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